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Spenser Little Bends Wire into Intricate Scenes, Portraits

When Spenser Little bends wire, an assuming material can become an elaborate tapestry. His narratives and figure studies range from playful to absorbing in their manipulations of form. At times, the artist will leave continuous wire works in public spaces across the world, toying with the contours and lines of street objects.

When Spenser Little bends wire, an assuming material can become an elaborate tapestry. His narratives and figure studies range from playful to absorbing in their manipulations of form. At times, the artist will leave continuous wire works in public spaces across the world, toying with the contours and lines of street objects.

“He has related his wire work to a mixture of playing chess and illustration, as the problem-solving component of the work is what continues to inspire himself to create larger and more complex pieces,” Thinkspace Projects says. “Some works contain moving components and multiple wires, but mostly the pieces are formed from one continuous piece of wire that is bent and molded to Little’s will.”

See more of Little’s work below.

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