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Lene Kilde’s Wistful, Sparse Figurative Sculptures

Lene Kilde, a sculptor based in Norway, creates works in which disparate body parts create fanciful scenes. At first glance, these sculptures may appear ominous or bleak, but further time spent with the work offers hints at wistful and youthful action. Or as Kilde says in a statement,“her intention is to invite the audience to use their own imagination so that they can complete the sculptures and fill in the lines and volume by themselves.The sculptures consist (of) concrete, metal mesh and air.”

Lene Kilde, a sculptor based in Norway, creates works in which disparate body parts create fanciful scenes. At first glance, these sculptures may appear ominous or bleak, but further time spent with the work offers hints at wistful and youthful action. Or as Kilde says in a statement,“her intention is to invite the audience to use their own imagination so that they can complete the sculptures and fill in the lines and volume by themselves.The sculptures consist (of) concrete, metal mesh and air.”



One may notice that the artist often uses children in her work. That’s a trend that a statement explains as such: She “creates sculptures inspired by children and their emotions. She finds that children’s body language is their purest form of communication. This is visualized by showing very few body parts, usually only hands and feet, which then are placed in proportion to each other with the use of metal mesh.”

The artist has exhibited her works in Norway, Denmark, and the U.S. Kilde’s background is in product design, having a master’s degree in the discipline. Afte graduating, she was awarded the Norwegian Arts Council scholarship. Since she has created work seen across the globe.


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