Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Jo Cope’s Hybrid Installations Look Forward in Fashion

Jo Cope, a conceptual fashion designer, mixes fine art and fashion. The artist intends to create pieces that are “hybrid installations that are perhaps only possible in a gallery but that nonetheless create a wearable garment and suggest alternative futures for fashion design.” Due to this blending of fields, her work has appeared in design stores, boutiques, and galleries across the world.

Jo Cope, a conceptual fashion designer, mixes fine art and fashion. The artist intends to create pieces that are “hybrid installations that are perhaps only possible in a gallery but that nonetheless create a wearable garment and suggest alternative futures for fashion design.” Due to this blending of fields, her work has appeared in design stores, boutiques, and galleries across the world.





The aforementioned aim in hybrid installations is evident in series like “The Language of Feet in the Walk of Life.” The piece “Walking in Circles” shows her designs in the various stages of walking. “Walking for me is a mesmerizing act and one that can hold much symbolism in life with reference to the journey and relationship with the self,” the artist says. The artist’s meticulous process ensured that each of the forms could be worn as easily as actual shoes.




Cope originally studied fashion design, before busting out of the field with a wider-ranging approach. The artist also uses video as a medium for her expressions, with both pragmatic in-process and conceptual approaches. Below, check out her video for “Adam’s Rib,” showing her tendency toward a Biblical influence in her works.

[vimeo 752589 w=600 h=512]

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
While one may look at Gabriel Dawe's installations and call them fantastical and even decorative, the artist considers working with thread an act of rebellion. Growing up in Mexico City, as a boy, the Texas-based artist was discouraged from taking an interest in embroidery. While thread is his preferred medium, he uses it for architectural means. His minimalist aesthetic departs greatly from traditional crafting. Instead, Dawe uses the thread to build translucent, colorful shapes that alter the spaces they inhabit. He calls them Plexuses, a term used to describe branching vessels or nerves. Dawe recently set up Plexus 28, a rich eggplant and crimson-hued piece composed of two concentric circles, at the Virginia MOCA. The MOCA created a time lapse video of the creation of the piece, as well as a short video interview with the artist. Check out more on Plexus 28 below and if you're curious about Dawe's other work, take a look at our previous post about the artist here.
South Korean, New York-based artist Ran Hwang uses buttons from the fashion industry to create large-scale, often immersive installations. The artist describes her process of hammering thousands of pins into a wall akin to a monk meditating. Both practices rely on repetition and result in something mystical.
Erika Lizée, an artist based in Los Angeles, created an installation for new exhibition “Shift and Fade” at BLAM's Los Angeles location. The show challenged artists in San Diego, New York, and Los Angeles to “explore material as a metaphor for personal history.” In response, Lizée crafted “Seed of Life,” an installation based in acrylic on Duralar.
The disturbing, seemingly organic forms created by Mireia Donat Melús take on an interactive edge with works like “Trou,” an installation that invites the viewer’s hand into the work and shows its exploration using an interior camera. His sculptures, made from nylon and empty silicone fiber, appear to be both human-grown and alien in nature.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List