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Chris Peters Paints Based on A.I. Creations

Chris Peters, an artist who emerged out of the Pop Surrealist movement, has used A.I. in a new way to create paintings of landscapes that don’t actually exist. Using an algorithm "capable of 'learning' and 'predicting,'" Peters fed the system a trove of curated landscape paintings. Soon, the A.I. was able to produce new digital images, and after processing and curating those landscapes, Peters painted his favorites in oil.

Chris Peters, an artist who emerged out of the Pop Surrealist movement, has used A.I. in a new way to create paintings of landscapes that don’t actually exist. Using an algorithm “capable of ‘learning’ and ‘predicting,'” Peters fed the system a trove of curated landscape paintings. Soon, the A.I. was able to produce new digital images, and after processing and curating those landscapes, Peters painted his favorites in oil.

Peters will unveil three of these at a private exhibition at Sullivan Goss on March 28. “In a wholly innovative collaboration between man and machine, new paintings have been manifested that promise us a glimpse into a world at once familiar and fantastic – our world, in fact, as seen by a new intelligence of our own design,” the TensorDream project says. “By painting this alien view, Chris Peters is beginning to understand the mind of the AI Muse. By looking at these works, we can too.”

See the digital print versions of these works below.

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