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Gil Bruvel’s Emerging, Sculptural Faces

In recent work, Gil Bruvel carefully arranges pieces of wood, with startling faces emerging. This is just one example of the sculptor’s work, which also spans metalworking, oil painting, and several other mediums. The artist’s larger sculptures, in particular, tend to render the human head in unexpected ways.

In recent work, Gil Bruvel carefully arranges pieces of wood, with startling faces emerging. This is just one example of the sculptor’s work, which also spans metalworking, oil painting, and several other mediums. The artist’s larger sculptures, in particular, tend to render the human head in unexpected ways.

“I am an artist because it is the conduit to release the ideas and visuals I carry daily,” the artist has said. “Since I was a little boy I have pursued my own exploration of creativity, rooted in the unconscious mind and nurtured with daily practice using a variety of mediums of artistic expression.”

See more of Bruvel’s work below.

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