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The Recyclable-Filled Renaissance Portraits of Suzanne Jongmans

Recycling packaging materials and other discardables, photographer Suzanne Jongmans crafts Renaissance-style portraits that examine contemporary consumption. The artist finds value in these otherwise overlooked materials; elsewhere, she piles clothes and finds beauty in unfinished garments.

Recycling packaging materials and other discardables, photographer Suzanne Jongmans crafts Renaissance-style portraits that examine contemporary consumption. The artist finds value in these otherwise overlooked materials; elsewhere, she piles clothes and finds beauty in unfinished garments.

A statement shows how these choices contrast with the accessories of centuries-old paintings: “Today’s symbols contrast with the allegoric objects seen in paintings of the Golden century. Pairing past with present. In Room for Change, the alluring whorl of plastic and polystyrene surrounding the head of the woman sees through the veil in a piece inspired by Rogier van der Weyden and where a butterfly on the model’s hand refers to ‘transformation.’”

See more of her portraits below.


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