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Richard Stipl’s Absorbing, Slightly Unsettling Figurative Sculptures

Czech artist Richard Stipl began his career as a painter, before moving on to the unsettling figurative sculptures for which he’s now known. The artist, based in Prague, conveys varying emotions and uses both two-dimensional and three-dimensional ideas to wrestle with humanity. A statement maintains that the work toils with the idea of creating art in itself. Materials used include oil on wax, ink on wood, clay, silver leaf, and several other tools.

Czech artist Richard Stipl began his career as a painter, before moving on to the unsettling figurative sculptures for which he’s now known. The artist, based in Prague, conveys varying emotions and uses both two-dimensional and three-dimensional ideas to wrestle with humanity. A statement maintains that the work toils with the idea of creating art in itself. Materials used include oil on wax, ink on wood, clay, silver leaf, and several other tools.

“Using himself as a model, Richard focuses exhaustively on the indefinite nature and moment-to-moment paradoxes inherent in the act of continuously recreating oneself throughout the course of a lifetime,” a statement says. “Characteristically, Stipl’s paintings and sculptural works alike force us to reconsider the role of boundaries and consequent categories of choice that comprise contemporary attitudes and approaches to art-making and art-consumption.”



The artist’s works have been shown in solo and group shows across the world. Recent runs have hosted his sculptures in Mexico, Germany, the Czech Republic, Turkey, France, and the U.S.


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