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The Intricate Masks of Magnhild Kennedy

Magnhild Kennedy, the Norwegian artist also known as Damselfrau, crafts intricate masks that mix fine art and fashion. She makes these pieces with both textiles and found objects. In a statement, the artist offers her own explanation of this approach:

Magnhild Kennedy, the Norwegian artist also known as Damselfrau, crafts intricate masks that mix fine art and fashion. She makes these pieces with both textiles and found objects. In a statement, the artist offers her own explanation of this approach:

“I work with masks as autonomous works of art as well as action-objects,” Kennedy says. “For me the mask is a place where different elements come together as situation. The work is about this place-situation, more so than the mask as a theme or category of form. The mask is a place. I am led by the phantasms appearing in the process of the making and the materials themselves. These guide my decisions and inform the objects I make.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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