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Sophia Narrett’s Stirring Embroidered Narratives

Sophia Narrett’s painterly approach to embroidery results in elaborate, startling scenes. Her themes traverse escapism, psychology, and sexuality. Each section of the work brings its own surprising sharpness, with a certain visceral quality resulting from the material.

Sophia Narrett’s painterly approach to embroidery results in elaborate, startling scenes. Her themes traverse escapism, psychology, and sexuality. Each section of the work brings its own surprising sharpness, with a certain visceral quality resulting from the material.

“Her highly contemporary narrative unfolds through the language of a deeply historical medium,” Freight + Volume says. “Although the origins of embroidery date back to as early as 5th century B.C., it has a distinct socio-economic history in America, wherein prior to the implementation of a public education system, it was one of several formal skills young girls were taught in a spirit of homemaking practicality. Narrett redefines this conventionally domestic craft and imbues the work with a haunting cerebral quality.”

See more of Narrett’s work below.

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