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Yoon Ji Seon’s Embroidered Mixed-Media Self Portraits

Yoon Ji Seon's embroidered portraits blend fiber and photography. Much of work consists of self-portraits, with varying degrees of emotions, abstraction, and detail. Her "Rag Face" series goes back to 2006, when she started experimenting with these mixed-media pieces.

Yoon Ji Seon‘s embroidered portraits blend fiber and photography. Much of work consists of self-portraits, with varying degrees of emotions, abstraction, and detail. Her “Rag Face” series goes back to 2006, when she started experimenting with these mixed-media pieces.

The genesis of this approach itself, for her, goes back even further: “I wasn’t able to think that sewing my face could disturb people,” the artist says. “I used to get over boring classes by drawing scars on portraits from textbooks or making over their faces totally different. Sewing my face was not too far from what I used to do. To be honest, I was the one who was more shocked and more surprised by audience response when I first exhibited Rag face series. Only very few people felt pleasure like how I felt. … It was funny how artist felt about my work was not very different from how un-artist felt.”

See more of her work below.

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