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Yuichi Ikehata’s Figures a Mix of Analogue, Digital

Surreal and haunting, Yuichi Ikehata creates works that begin as figurative wire sculptures and garner new life via digital flourishes. The Japanese artist’s meticulous process ensures that it’s difficult to tell which parts of the structure are part of the tangible framework. The final product, though elegant, seems to convey a world in which we’ve lost and eroded ourselves to technology.

Surreal and haunting, Yuichi Ikehata creates works that begin as figurative wire sculptures and garner new life via digital flourishes. The Japanese artist’s meticulous process ensures that it’s difficult to tell which parts of the structure are part of the tangible framework. The final product, though elegant, seems to convey a world in which we’ve lost and eroded ourselves to technology.

“The world of reality and non-reality,” the artist describes. “They are very intimate, so it is not too much to say that they are almost one. We touch non-reality with reality as a key and sometimes touch reality using a key of non-reality. Reality is beautiful, sad, funny and completed, but happens nothing there. Fragments that cut out of reality already show a fictitious world. I collect the fragments, edit, arrange and capture them. It is just a ‘pure myth.’ However, my real world.”

See more of his works below.

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