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Bryan Valenzuela’s Drawings Consist of Thousands of Words

Though undetectable from afar, Bryan Valenzuela's drawn forms are actually crafted from thousands of small letters and words. These collections of words are a script tailored to each work, whether on the page or adorning a public wall. The artist also works in textiles, acrylic paint, and collage into his practice.

Though undetectable from afar, Bryan Valenzuela‘s drawn forms are actually crafted from thousands of small letters and words. These collections of words are a script tailored to each work, whether on the page or adorning a public wall. The artist also works in textiles, acrylic paint, and collage into his practice.

“Building images with the written word is my primary visual focus,” the artist says. “Paragraphs, sentences, phrases, and fragments are all the foundations of my work, acting as both form and content. As form, the text delineates figures and subjects layer upon layer as shading. Words varying in size and density from the minuscule and virtually unreadable, to large and bold are used in a manner similar to crosshatching. They carve out shadow and light with pen, ink, or acrylic marker in a handwritten drawing technique. As content, the language provides a sense of the inherent information and associations, metaphors and meanings embedded in everyday existence.”

See more of the artist’s work below.


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