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David Moreno’s Surreal Sculptures Are ‘Drawn’ with Wires

Barcelona, Spain based artist David Moreno has found a unique approach to translating his drawings into the third dimension. His series titled "Drawing in Space" features sculptures made of steel wires that emulate the fast and energetic style of drawing in a rather wild and sometimes uncontrolled way. Though they are built using a stiff material, Moreno's sculptures of surreal floating cabins, chairs, and figures exhibit a certain delicacy and tenderness. Using a similar technique to cross-hatching, he is able to create tonal or shading effects of carefully placed lines that are viewed from a specific vantage point.

Barcelona, Spain based artist David Moreno has found a unique approach to translating his drawings into the third dimension. His series titled “Drawing in Space” features sculptures made of steel wires that emulate the fast and energetic style of drawing in a rather wild and sometimes uncontrolled way. Though they are built using a stiff material, Moreno’s sculptures of surreal floating cabins, chairs, and figures exhibit a certain delicacy and tenderness. Using a similar technique to cross-hatching, he is able to create tonal or shading effects of carefully placed lines that are viewed from a specific vantage point. As you walk around each piece, the form disappears into the mass of material that Moreno describes as “micro-atmospheres”. Wires are not the only material that Moreno has used. He has also incorporated threads, needles (and a lot of his time, he says) where a single continuous thread is tied around the needles and overlapped until the subject takes shape. Take a look at more sculptures by David Moreno below.


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