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David Moreno’s Wire ‘Drawings’ Evolve

Spanish artist David Moreno’s wild, wire sculptures have evolved into more vibrant, kinetic creations. Whether carried in the palm of your hand or standing waist-high, these absorbing works appear at once erratic and meticulous. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 43, available here, and he was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Spanish artist David Moreno’s wild, wire sculptures have evolved into more vibrant, kinetic creations. Whether carried in the palm of your hand or standing waist-high, these absorbing works appear at once erratic and meticulous. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 43, available here, and he was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.


“For this show he explores new territories,” a statement for his recent show at N2 Galeria in Spain. “On the one hand, experimentation with color to add another dimension to his sculpture. On the other hand, he goes a little further in the construction of imaginary spaces.”

Perhaps the best description for Moreno’s work is found in the artist’s Instagram bio, in which he offers four words: “Trying to draw sculptures.” In these new works, it appears that the artist’s success in doing so is becoming more and more realized.

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