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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Hyuro’s Site-Specific Narrative Murals

The murals of Tamara Djurovic, also known as Hyuro, don’t just work with the unique features of a wall: Each integrates its makeshift canvas for site-specific narratives. Her works are often intimate scenes, moving between interpersonal tension and solitary whimsy.

The murals of Tamara Djurovic, also known as Hyuro, don’t just work with the unique features of a wall: Each integrates its makeshift canvas for site-specific narratives. Her works are often intimate scenes, moving between interpersonal tension and solitary whimsy.


“Hyuro doesn’t paint on the streets,” a statement says. “I am not interested to know about her origins, nor when she was born … I do not care where she comes from, let alone where she goes. The interesting thing from Hyuro is Hyuro, here and now. Everything else will always come over. Her work is intimate and very personal. Her universe, disturbing and seductive. Her language is honest and forthcoming. Her head are her hands and her paintings a gift for the streets of the city. In her work, Hyuro, does not speak about her… talks to her. Uses the wall as a mirror in which constantly seeks and is, in this process, that painting rescues the echo of that conversation with herself.”

See more of Hyuro’s work below.

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