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Refik Anadol’s Massive LED Media Wall Installation Looks at Memory

With "Melting Memories," media artist Refik Anadol created a massive LED installation “comprising data paintings, augmented data sculptures and light projections” that offer interpretations of movements within the brain at Pilevneli Gallery. A statement sats that it's the artist's latest experiment that looks at "the materiality of remembering."

With “Melting Memories,” media artist Refik Anadol created a massive LED installation “comprising data paintings, augmented data sculptures and light projections” that offer interpretations of movements within the brain at Pilevneli Gallery. A statement sats that it’s the artist’s latest experiment that looks at “the materiality of remembering.”

A statement offer some background on the project: “Each work grows out of the artist’s impressive experiments with the advanced technology tools provided by the Neuroscape Laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco. Neuroscape is a neuroscience center focusing on technology creation and scientific research on brain function of both healthy and impaired individuals. Anadol gathers data on the neural mechanisms of cognitive control from an EEG (electroencephalogram) that measures changes in brain wave activity and provides evidence of how the brain functions over time. These data sets constitute the building blocks for the unique algorithms that the artist needs for the multi-dimensional visual structures on display.”

See more stills from the project below.

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