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Skunk Control’s Spellbinding Installations Combine Art, Science

Skunk Control is an ensemble of educators, scientists, and engineers who create installations designed to inspire wonder and “prompt audiences to reflect, question and engage them in the art of discovery.” This immersive pairing of art and science implements electronics, advanced lighting and optics, and other technologies. Yet, often, the group’s gorgeous designs are the points of entry into the works, with the tagline "Where Science Meets Art." The group is based in Australia, at the College of Engineering and Science at Victoria University.

Skunk Control is an ensemble of educators, scientists, and engineers who create installations designed to inspire wonder and “prompt audiences to reflect, question and engage them in the art of discovery.” This immersive pairing of art and science implements electronics, advanced lighting and optics, and other technologies. Yet, often, the group’s gorgeous designs are the points of entry into the works, with the tagline “Where Science Meets Art.” The group is based in Australia, at the College of Engineering and Science at Victoria University.

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[vimeo 164368470 w=600 h=360]

An installation in February, “Harvest Harbinger,” displayed the power of the natural world, as a testament to the suburb Maribyrnong’s cultural diversity. More than 86 different food-based elements were used. Last year’s “Secluded Evolution” had a different charge: “’Secluded Evolution’ considers light’s influence in the transformation of a species secluded in darkness and hidden out of sight in the infinitesimal interstices between thoughts,” the group says in a statement. “It’s found a way in. Found a way into this dark world, into its code and into its structure. It provides this dark world with aspiration, enlightenment, tools and momentum.” The installation was created for the Gertrude Street Projection Festival in Melbourne.

Check out photos and videos from more of the group’s installations below.


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[vimeo 162927520 w=600 h=360]

[vimeo 90190714 w=600 h=360]

[vimeo 142194045 w=600 h=360]

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