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Song Kang’s Sculptures Look at Architecture, Natural Structures

Portland illustrator Song Kang blends architecture and natural structures in both her intensely detailed drawings and her absorbing sculptures. The latter even uses the inherent forms of the animal kingdom as foundations for her designs. The "Vernacular" series has works created from wood, paper mache, plaster, fiber, recyclables, and other materials.

Portland illustrator Song Kang blends architecture and natural structures in both her intensely detailed drawings and her absorbing sculptures. The latter even uses the inherent forms of the animal kingdom as foundations for her designs. The “Vernacular” series has works created from wood, paper mache, plaster, fiber, recyclables, and other materials.


“The term ‘vernacular’ tends to correlate with all things commonplace; however, in the architectural sense, the ‘vernacular’ exemplifies man’s abilities to adapt to his surroundings and build with his environment,” the artist says, on her sculptures. “This series explores the symbiotic relationship between the vernacular home and the environmental context in which it exist.”

Her series “Carved in Stone” carries a more literal title, with structures implanted in stone-like sculptures. See more of the artist’s sculptures—as well as a couple drawings—below.

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