Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Adam Parker Smith’s Fiberglass, Resin Sculptures Emulate Party Accessories

Adam Parker Smith, a sculptor and installation artist based in New York, creates works that offer different insights at every perspective. His sculptures, made from resin, fiberglass, steel, and preserved mylar, emulate party balloons, recalling the work of artists like Jeff Koons. Yet Smith exposes the hollow innards of his work at different angles, and calls upon inspiration from centuries past.

Adam Parker Smith, a sculptor and installation artist based in New York, creates works that offer different insights at every perspective. His sculptures, made from resin, fiberglass, steel, and preserved mylar, emulate party balloons, recalling the work of artists like Jeff Koons. Yet Smith exposes the hollow innards of his work at different angles, and calls upon inspiration from centuries past.



During a recent show at The Hole in New York City, the gallery said this about Smith’s work: “While the artist is inspired by classical works like Augustus of Primaporta, the Artemision Bronze, the Venus de Milo or Winged Victory, to contemporary eyes the works evoke perhaps a sagging Koons balloon sculpture, or to a non art person, a birthday array the morning after,” the gallery says. “Like the wall works, the sculptures aren’t transcending their materials, they are kind of unapologetically chintzy, but owning it. At different angles the effect changes: on approach the sculptures are perfect and temporary fake loveliness, and on the back as they recede you see the messy reality of how they were made and yet simultaneously their permanence.”



Smith’s recent shows have taken his work to San Francisco, New York, and Chicago. His wall work, also emulating varying materials, textiles, and textures, offer assemblages of different themes.



Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles

Jessica Joslin is the creatrix of a curious menagerie of hybird creatures, composed of a varied anatomy of bone, glass, leather and metal, meticulously assembled to look like real specimens. Her work recalls a sense of the Victorian era's obsession with detail and death and yet retains a playfulness attributed to circus shows of trained animals performing gravity defying feats. Hi-Fructose was recently able to interview the artist, take a look at her intriguing responses after the jump.

Taking influence from Byzantine art and other eras of religious art, Aleksandar Todorovic renders contemporary tech figures as religious icons and social media symbols as sacred, in egg tempera and acrylic. Elsewhere, his painted and sculpture works look at consumerism and contemporary global politics. He recently displayed this works under the title “Religion Remastered.”
Toronto-based artist TALWST creates miniature worlds inside of vintage jewelry boxes with scenes that touch upon art history, folklore, pop culture, and current events. While some of his miniature dioramas are humorous and lighthearted, others draw attention to pressing human rights crises.
In her ceramic sculptures, Janet Beckhouse taps into ancient contemplations on life, death, and nature. Though at times disconcerting, with writhing floral elements enveloping her figures, each work is executed with elegance. Beckhouse crafts these sculptures in both towering and handheld scales.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List