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Rafael Varona’s Animated ‘Bottles’ Contain Intricate Narratives

Rafael Varona is a illustrator, graphic designer, and self-described “loopaholic” based in Amsterdam and Berlin. The artist creates elaborate GIFs of bizarre machines and nature scenes, for both personal and commercial endeavors. The artist’s “Impossible Bottles” series, which place outlandish situations inside bottle-like vessels, is now in its second set.

Rafael Varona is a illustrator, graphic designer, and self-described “loopaholic” based in Amsterdam and Berlin. The artist creates elaborate GIFs of bizarre machines and nature scenes, for both personal and commercial endeavors. The artist’s “Impossible Bottles” series, which place outlandish situations inside bottle-like vessels, is now in its second set.

“Unlike the meditative atmosphere in the former bottles – a more vivid and intense ambience is created inside these bottles,” the artist says, of “Impossible Bottles 2.” “Also the plot – if there is one – concentrates more on the things hidden beneath us. The creatures underground.”

One, in particular, focuses on the goddess rendered in “Mama Killa” statues (above). The artist’s family is from Peru, and he has “always been fascinated by the mysterious and mythical life of the Incas.” The narrative unfolds above the goddess, in which the native people are exploited for the land’s treasures.



Outside of his personal series, Varona has done a number of loops for ad campaigns and other programs. His list of clients includes Adobe, Intel, Yelp, Letterkundig Museum, KPMG, the Washington Post, Squamish Festival, and several others.

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