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Rebeka Elizegi’s Handcrafted Collages Explore Femininity

The handcrafted works of Rebeka Elizegi, a collage artist based in Barcelona, Spain, come in varying sizes and scopes. And much of Elizegi’s work involves the female figure, along with the topics of “generic diversity and sexual ambiguity,” according to the artist. The artist says that she’s often fascinated by what the observer interprets from her surreal works, with much of the visuals intentionally garnering differing takes.

The handcrafted works of Rebeka Elizegi, a collage artist based in Barcelona, Spain, come in varying sizes and scopes. And much of Elizegi’s work involves the female figure, along with the topics of “generic diversity and sexual ambiguity,” according to the artist. The artist says that she’s often fascinated by what the observer interprets from her surreal works, with much of the visuals intentionally garnering differing takes.




“I like to combine thumbnails and large pieces in the same space, thereby creating a universe of ‘flying’ figures out of paper and cardboard,” Elizegi says, in a statement. “I often work with silhouetted figures mounted on foam and wood, which seem as if they were ‘floating’ next to the wall, projecting a small shadow, and creating an effect of lightness and volatility.





The artist has taken part in Barcelona, Madrid, Los Angeles, and Berlin, and her illustrations have appeared in publications like Sample Magazine, Visual, Inspirational, and others. In the 2016 body of work “La Llorona,” the artist collaborated with photographer Ismael Rosales; the result was a collection of portraits of Mexican women, with the piece below included.



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