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Joanne Nam’s Dreamlike Oil Paintings

Joanne Nam’s oil paintings often focus on females or animals against desolate, wooded backdrops. Each stares off in contemplation, with Nam’s single-word titles often offering context with descriptors like “Lucid,” “Numb,” or “Belong.” Her recent works are even more dreamlike, blending in touches of gold leaf. Nam was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Joanne Nam’s oil paintings often focus on females or animals against desolate, wooded backdrops. Each stares off in contemplation, with Nam’s single-word titles often offering context with descriptors like “Lucid,” “Numb,” or “Belong.” Her recent works are even more dreamlike, blending in touches of gold leaf. Nam was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

For insight on how her approach has evolved, a snippet from a 2014 interview between HF and the artist: “Recently, I’m trying to find the balance between abstraction and realism. In the beginning, I used to paint with a lot of brush strokes, but somehow obsessed trying not to show brush strokes over last three years. Now I’m trying to combine two. I appreciate variety textures and smoothness of two different styles I have.”

See more of her recent works below.

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