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Junko Mizuno Tells the Story of Her Three Favorite Characters in “TRIAD”

Japanese born, San Francisco based artist Junko Mizuno (featured on the cover of HF Vol. 23) has a penchant for sweetly demonic characters. Her colorful paintings, drawings and graphic novels feature witch-like goddesses, sexy over-eating vixens, and fairytale-inspired girls with badass magical powers. Among them all, Junko Mizuno has her three favorites: a witch, a nurse, and a wrestler. The trio makes up the starring characters in her latest exhibition "TRIAD", opening tonight at Cotton Candy Machine Gallery in Brooklyn, which is closing its doors at the end of this year.

Japanese born, San Francisco based artist Junko Mizuno (featured on the cover of HF Vol. 23) has a penchant for sweetly demonic characters. Her colorful paintings, drawings and graphic novels feature witch-like goddesses, sexy over-eating vixens, and fairytale-inspired girls with badass magical powers. Among them all, Junko Mizuno has her three favorites: a witch, a nurse, and a wrestler. The trio makes up the starring characters in her latest exhibition “TRIAD”, opening tonight at Cotton Candy Machine Gallery in Brooklyn, which is closing its doors at the end of this year. Throughout her works are traces of her comic books, such as Pure Trance, and influences from the “father of Manga” Osamu Tezuka and Japanese animation films like Akira. Her ultra-cute with dirty and grotesque imagery mashes up futuristic and primitive themes. “TRIAD” takes place in the future, where we find her trio living together in a fancy mansion. They go about their day, feeding their hungry children with bare-breasted fountains of milk, sleeping in their beds, fantasizing about wild adventures and surgical experiments. Meanwhile, the world outside is about to be invaded by a race of sexy female aliens. If you sense a new Junko Mizuno comic in the works, so do we.

Take a look at more works from “TRIAD”, below, opening tonight at Cotton Candy Machine Gallery in Brooklyn, and running through November 29th, 2015.


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