Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Maria Teicher Exhibits New Hyper-real Portraits in “Here Together, So Alone”

Hyper-realist painter Maria Teicher, featured here, likens the experience of being an artist to being in high school. As a student, she felt like an outcast who didn't quite fit in, a "loner" forced into an artificial social dynamic. Teicher explores this theme in per paintings, which portray people in powerless moments, often wrapped in "veils" that distort their faces. Her work almost stops your breath, not only for her impressive use of the oil medium, but because you can feel the moment of constriction. For her latest body of work "Here Together, So Alone" at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, Teicher observes how we group ourselves together as humans while remaining inexplicably alone.

Hyper-realist painter Maria Teicher, featured here, likens the experience of being an artist to being in high school. As a student, she felt like an outcast who didn’t quite fit in, a “loner” forced into an artificial social dynamic. Teicher explores this theme in per paintings, which portray people in powerless moments, often wrapped in “veils” that distort their faces. Her work almost stops your breath, not only for her impressive use of the oil medium, but because you can feel the moment of constriction. For her latest body of work “Here Together, So Alone” at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia, Teicher observes how we group ourselves together as humans while remaining inexplicably alone. The clear, veiled pieces that envelop her figures are meant to represent masks, which she says mirror our personalities. Sometimes, a lip, an eyelid, or article of clothing peeks through, revealing the true form that is underneath. In her show statement, Teicher says, “People are always covering pieces of themselves to be well mannered, accepted, more liked, etc. Sometimes our masks are transparent and sometimes they are more opaque. This process can be quite suffocating in certain situations.” The centerpiece of her exhibit is a piece portraying two figures wrapped by a veil; lovers slightly separated by the material that binds them and unable to fully complete their embrace. They are together, while still being alone.

Maria Teicher’s “Here Together, So Alone” is now on view at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia through November 1st, 2015.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Spanish artist Ivana Flores crafts pop-surrealist oil paintings with both a childlike sense of whimsy and ominous undertones. At grand sizes, the works carry an absorbing quality that pulls you into her worlds. Her work has been described as “reality, dream, everyday life and imagination merge at a turning point of boundless consciousness of self-image and world.”
In his third show at 111 Minna Gallery, Mike Davis offers new whimsical paintings that appear as a continuation of the Northern Renaissance while blending in notes of the artist’s own time period. "Crooked as a Dog's Hind Leg" kicks off on Jan. 10 and runs through Feb. 29 at the space. Davis was last featured on our site here.
The expressive oil paintings of Russian born and Philadelphia based artist Alex Kanevsky, long admired by artists we cover, are based simply on his observations of others. (We can thank Andrew Hem for pointing us to Kanevsky’s latest work.) Kanevky’s style is a mix of figurative with cubist-like marks by his palette knife. His relaxed figures break apart into geometrical gestures that imply their movement through the space. It’s as if he painted these scenes with his brush set on a slow shutter speed. Kanevsky credits a range of aesthetically different artists as inspiration, from Van Gogh, Cezanne, Mondrian, Rothko, Kline, to Freud, the list goes on. Yet all of their influences can be found in his paintings one way or another. See more after the jump.
Paul Romano presents a new series of melancholic paintings for his solo show, "Boundless," opening at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia on May 1. The works in "Boundless" examine the turns that life can take and celebrate the beauty that can emerge from dark times. "'Boundless' does have a leaning in the melancholy, contemplating ideas of oneself through tribulation and loss and then, what remains," writes Romano. "What is left is hopeful, the vastness of oneself, not defined by outside perceptions, or objects, or a place, or a relationship." His highly symbolic paintings draw from personal experiences, fantasy, and mythology alike, emerging with narratives that celebrate the triumph of the human spirit.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List