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Vania Zouravliov Mixes Sex, Beauty and Decay in Dark Illustrations

Vania Zouravliov (HF Vol. 16) mixes elements of innocence, sexuality, beauty and decay into his intricate, colorless illustrations. Russian born and currently based in London, Zouraliov's begins each piece without sketches, allowing the narrative of his dark universe to flow as the work progresses. From an early age, Zouravilov was inspired by The Bible, Dante's Divine Comedy, early Disney films, and North American Indian imagery.

Vania Zouravliov (HF Vol. 16) mixes elements of innocence, sexuality, beauty and decay into his intricate, colorless illustrations. Russian born and currently based in London, Zouraliov’s begins each piece without sketches, allowing the narrative of his dark universe to flow as the work progresses. From an early age, Zouravilov was inspired by The Bible, Dante’s Divine Comedy, early Disney films, and North American Indian imagery. Having worked on comics for Fantagraphics books and several books for the “Erotic Society”, there is an aspect of his style that feels like a graphic novel. Zouravliov renders his femme fatale like subjects with realistic detail and without color, adding a certain grittiness to their seductive nature. Others are more classically posed, seemingly unconcerned and inconversant to the death and state of their often decomposing surroundings.

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