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Preview: “Freaks and Wonders” by Ciou and Malojo at White Lady Art

French duo Ciou and Malojo create illustrative works that combine their wildest fantasies and nightmares. Their previous show for Cotton Candy Machine gallery (covered here) displayed Malojo’s cartoony characters infused with colorful patterns, while Ciou’s work was mostly monochromatic. Their next show, “Freaks and Wonders” opens September 4th at White Lady Art in Dublin, and is inspired by scenes of celebration during seasonal holidays.

French duo Ciou and Malojo create illustrative works that combine their wildest fantasies and nightmares. Their previous show for Cotton Candy Machine gallery (covered here) displayed Malojo’s cartoony characters infused with colorful patterns, while Ciou’s work was mostly monochromatic. Their next show, “Freaks and Wonders” opens September 4th at White Lady Art in Dublin, and is inspired by scenes of celebration during seasonal holidays. Ciou’s new work represents her aesthetic, which she describes as dark and cute, with a twist on different cultures she’s experienced. She uses American 50s and 70s inspired colors, mixed with Japanese gouache and acrylics for the base- a departure from her vintage paper collage bases. Malojo’s pieces are warm and saturated, featuring dancing demonic like characters who breathe fire and water. Both artists spend their free time near the ocean, and this environment is also reflected in their motifs. Ciou adds, “The theme of the show is a confrontation between the monsters and the beauties, the mystical and reasonable passing time, the greeting seasons and celebration of passing time, the legends connecting with the seasons, but it’s an infinite theme present in all different culture around the world, so I think I will keep searching for it in my entire life.”

Ciou:

Malojo:

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