Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Martin Wittfooth Offers Artist Talk, Q&A at Virginia MOCA

In conjunction with "Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose" at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, painter Martin Wittfooth visits for a talk and Q&A on Thursday, Nov. 10. The narratives of the artist's paintings focus on animals, offering allegorical and dystopian tales of a post-human world. The artist created the cover for Hi-Fructose Volume 35. The talk, kicking off at 6:30 p.m., is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Get more info here.

In conjunction with “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose” at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, painter Martin Wittfooth visits for a talk and Q&A on Thursday, Nov. 10. The narratives of the artist’s paintings focus on animals, offering allegorical and dystopian tales of a post-human world. The artist created the cover for Hi-Fructose Volume 35. The talk, kicking off at 6:30 p.m., is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Get more info here.



The Toronto-born artist spent a majority of his childhood in Finland, before moving back to his hometown and after graduating from Sheridan College, ended up in New York City. When asked by beinArt Gallery what draws him to classical painting, he offered some insight: “Classical oil paintings often have something really incredible trapped inside of them: a kind of time capsule into eras and the philosophies and social culture of past times, which only art can give us a genuine glimpse of.”

Last month, “The Archaic Revival,” occupied Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles. The title was inspired by ethnobotanist and philosopher Terence McKenna, who held a theory that society was reverting back to archaic values and norms in order to heal itself from a modern, poisonous condition.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Eguchi Ayane is a Japanese artist whose oil paintings transport the viewer to candy-colored fantasy lands. Yet within these whimsical worlds, startling scenarios unfold. Juxtaposing 'cutesy' images of teddy bears, bow ties and charming creatures with the darker undercurrent of her narratives, the artist expresses the duality of not only her world, but ours as well. Find more of her work on Twitter.
San Diego-based painter Jasmine Worth blends gloomy surrealism and religious iconography in her oil paintings. In her newest show at La Luz De Jesus in Los Angeles, the artist evolves this mix, with works that move between meditations on symbology and females of the cloth. Worth was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and you can find the artist on Instagram here. The show runs through Aug. 28.
In Michael Villagante's recent oil paintings, the artist's distinct texture and ability to evoke past masters and mythology shine. A recent body of work, under the title of "Higher Ground" in a recent show at Art Verité in his native Philippines, takes his work in a direction that offers more peace than turmoil, even as the human body is overtaken by the surrounding elements.
John Brosio’s oil paintings introduce towering monsters and pop cultural elements into the everyday, whether it’s a giant crab or a Big Gulp. The artist has a knack for mixing terror and humor, leaning on his talents in realism to add both components to the work. Elsewhere, he takes a childlike approach to rendering these beasts, reaching back to the sketchbooks packed with dinosaurs and fictional creatures as a child.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List