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Bizarre Paintings of Rubber Glove Florals by Mikel Glass

New Jersey based artist Mikel Glass began painting his bizarre rubber glove florals over ten years ago. Since then, they've continued to pop up in his various works, slowly building out a series of 30 paintings. He paints them in a variety of blooms and palettes from bright rainbow colors to romantic pastels. The gloves are not Glass' only subject. He's also an accomplished painter of portraits and still life, for which he sculpts unusual sets made of toys, rubber balls, and pumpkins that turn into self-consuming fruit baskets. Unlike these inanimate objects, the gloves take on a personality of their own as something meant to be worn by a living person.

New Jersey based artist Mikel Glass began painting his bizarre rubber glove florals over ten years ago. Since then, they’ve continued to pop up in his various works, slowly building out a series of 30 paintings. He paints them in a variety of blooms and palettes from bright rainbow colors to romantic pastels. The gloves are not Glass’ only subject. He’s also an accomplished painter of portraits and still life, for which he sculpts unusual sets made of toys, rubber balls, and pumpkins that turn into self-consuming fruit baskets. Unlike these inanimate objects, the gloves take on a personality of their own as something meant to be worn by a living person. Still lifes of flowers once convened religious and allegorical meaning, as in Hans Memlings’ florals, which were deeply rooted in the medieval symbolism of the Virgin. Glass tends to assign metaphorical meaning to the attributes of his own paintings. However, he admits the meaning behind his florals is a mystery. In a recent interview, he shares, “The advantage of exploring a single subject in a serial fashion is that deeper layers of meaning continually reveal themselves.”

Mikel Glass is currently exhibiting in the “Hypnagogia” Group Show at Koplin Del Rio, previewed here.

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