Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Jonny Green’s Still Life Paintings Add Character to Inanimate Objects

Jonny Green's oil paintings of haphazardly-made sculptures are part portrait, part still life. The UK based painter, who lives and works in London, describes his work as a combination of the "carefree and painstaking", images of crudely built subjects made of a strange selection of items- modelling clay, office tape, flowers, Christmas lights, and whatever else is immediately available to him- which he then renders in incredibly meticulous detail.

Jonny Green’s oil paintings of haphazardly-made sculptures are part portrait, part still life. The UK based painter, who lives and works in London, describes his work as a combination of the “carefree and painstaking”, images of crudely built subjects made of a strange selection of items- modelling clay, office tape, flowers, Christmas lights, and whatever else is immediately available to him- which he then renders in incredibly meticulous detail.

Green admits that he was not always interested in sculpture, but a recent visit with family found him toying with old plasticine from his childhood one night. “I then photographed these weird little objects, using the materials available to me, i.e. kitchen towels as a backdrop, an old lamp as the only lighting. I was surprised by the power of the images and decided to try and make paintings from them,” he explains.

Though inanimate, his subjects appear surprisingly full of character, even off-putting, bringing to mind other artists who share a “grotesque” aesthetic, like Christian Rex van Minnen, Brendan Danielsson, and Gregory Jacobson. “There is something about the nature of little objects- their abject and pathetic demeanor, the fact that they appear to be trying to validate their existence with flowers and the draping of ribbons,” Green says, “it’s that anthropomorphism that makes them more than bits of old rubbish.”

Jonny Green’s work can be seen next in his solo exhibition “Bad to the Bone”, opening today, May 12th, at The Contemporary London.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Bahamas native Lavar Munroe's 2D and 3D works blend real-world, bleak experiences and mythology. His works can appear at once visceral and intimate in their execution. Through his sculptures of humans and canines, as well as his mixed-media scenes, the artist "maps a personal journey of survival and trauma in a world of gang violence, drugs, murder, self-discovery, development and overcoming obstacles through self-determination," Jack Bell Gallery says.
Over the past few decades, Shary Boyle has garnered attention for a multifaceted practice that includes ceramics, painting, installations, drawings, and more. In this post, we take a look at some of her recent sculptures, which toy with vintage and ancient incarnations of rendering humanity through ceramics.
What do you get when you cross a roller coaster with a picnic table? Probably something that resembles Michael Beitz's imaginative takes on the furniture we encounter on a daily basis. Beitz turns mundane objects into innovative sculptural forms that are at once artistic and functional. He flips the script on how to build desks, tables, benches, and couches -- twisting their shapes, turning them into curly cues, or making them bend, stretch, and melt in unexpected ways. His work always has a sense of humor and inspires viewers to become curious about their everyday surroundings.
Luke O’Sullivan (previously featured here) creates three dimensional art that brings the worlds of drawing and sculpture together. Inspired by dystopian science fiction films, O’Sullivan builds environments composed of peculiar buildings and subterranean lairs. Using textured façades as well as screen-printed surfaces, his latest series of works entitled “Cool Shelter" creates a fantastical scene of overworld and underworld labyrinths. The artist will present his latest series on Friday, July 24th at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Hi-Fructose was invited to have a special exclusive preview into Luke O’Sullivan’s latest layered industrial landscapes.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List