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Frank Magnotta’s Playful, Highly Detailed Graphite Drawings

New York illustrator Frank Magnotta's hyperactive graphite drawings brim with visual onomatopoeias. Intricate block letters connect the complex mechanical parts of surreal structures, which, like Rube Goldberg machines, appear too cumbersome to be functional. The textual elements of his work evoke advertising and design, but the slogans he chooses send conflicting messages that bombard the viewer with information. Magnotta's portrait work is similarly Frankenstein-esque. Each of his dense, grayscale drawings stitches together a variety of elements that the viewer must pick apart to fully understand the contents of each image.

New York illustrator Frank Magnotta’s hyperactive graphite drawings brim with visual onomatopoeias. Intricate block letters connect the complex mechanical parts of surreal structures, which, like Rube Goldberg machines, appear too cumbersome to be functional. The textual elements of his work evoke advertising and design, but the slogans he chooses send conflicting messages that bombard the viewer with information. Magnotta’s portrait work is similarly Frankenstein-esque. Each of his dense, grayscale drawings stitches together a variety of elements that the viewer must pick apart to fully understand the contents of each image.

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