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Olivia Kemp’s Enormous Pen Drawings

Olivia Kemp’s massive drawings, mostly rendered in pen, contain a preposterous amount of detail. Her work often contains historical structures enveloped by the natural world. The drawings can take months at a time to complete.

Olivia Kemp’s massive drawings, mostly rendered in pen, contain a preposterous amount of detail. Her work often contains historical structures enveloped by the natural world. The drawings can take months at a time to complete.

“I draw in order to make sense of landscape but also to construct and remodel it,” the artist says. “I build worlds and imaginary places that grow out of a need to interpret the sites that I have known, expanding and developing them across a page. This encompasses everything, from the visions of a grand landscape right down to the details of the land, the plants and creatures that may inhabit it.”

The artist’s education includes time at Winchester School of Art, Wimbledon College of Art, and the Royal Drawing School. She’s had residencies in Scotland, Italy, Spain, Norway, and elsewhere.

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