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The Converging Worlds of Cristòfol Pons

The acrylic paintings and drawings of Cristòfol Pons are visions of converging realities: past and future, art history and something otherworldly. His characters and visual motifs, though consistent throughout his work, point in varying directions. As he’s said, “The present is just a moment that vanishes at every step, the past is a blurry haze and future a horizon longing to fade.” He will at times point to the recognizable, perhaps a piece by Jeff Koons or a historical icon, yet only as a point of entry into something else entirely.

The acrylic paintings and drawings of Cristòfol Pons are visions of converging realities: past and future, art history and something otherworldly. His characters and visual motifs, though consistent throughout his work, point in varying directions. As he’s said, “The present is just a moment that vanishes at every step, the past is a blurry haze and future a horizon longing to fade.” He will at times point to the recognizable, perhaps a piece by Jeff Koons or a historical icon, yet only as a point of entry into something else entirely.

“Picasso said: Art is a lie that approach us to truth,” a statement says. “Cristòfol Pons thinks that reality is relative and subjective, and that honesty doesn’t have to be a condition for art. There’s a constant game with reality to accommodate to its taste and order, and explaining like this, with metaphors and exaggerations, conditions that are as real as a landscape.”

See more of his work below.

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