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Aryz Paints New Mural at the Vilnius Street Art Festival

We recently spotted Aryz's massive wall at the We AArt mural festival in Denmark (see our coverage here) and shortly after, the prolific Spanish artist traveled to Vilnius, Lithuania to paint a new mural for the Vilnius Street Art Festival. Aryz took an atypical route in the creation of this piece: though it appears geometrically organized and precise, he painted the mural without sketching out his idea prior to coming to the wall. Before he arrived, the wall already had the words “Kaip Ne Žmogus” (or, "Not Like Human") tagged on it. Aryz incorporated the text into his piece, and it seems to fittingly describe this otherworldly scene.

We recently spotted Aryz’s massive wall at the We AArt mural festival in Denmark (see our coverage here) and shortly after, the prolific Spanish artist traveled to Vilnius, Lithuania to paint a new mural for the Vilnius Street Art Festival. Aryz took an atypical route in the creation of this piece: though it appears geometrically organized and precise, he painted the mural without sketching out his idea prior to coming to the wall. Before he arrived, the wall already had the words “Kaip Ne Žmogus” (or, “Not Like Human”) tagged on it. Aryz incorporated the text into his piece, and it seems to fittingly describe this otherworldly scene.

Photos by Henrik Haven.

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