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Amsterdam Light Festival Returns in Netherlands

Tom Biddulph and Barbara Ryan

The Amsterdam Light Festival has returned, and with it, a startling new set of light-based public works are on display through Jan. 19. “Disturbance lies at the heart of the exhibition of the eighth edition of the Amsterdam Light Festival with its theme 'DISRUPT!'” the event says. “Artists, designers, and architects were challenged to question, test and shake up Amsterdam in alignment with the theme.” Photos by Janus van den Eijnden.


Tom Biddulph and Barbara Ryan

The Amsterdam Light Festival has returned, and with it, a startling new set of light-based public works are on display through Jan. 19. “Disturbance lies at the heart of the exhibition of the eighth edition of the Amsterdam Light Festival with its theme ‘DISRUPT!’” the event says. “Artists, designers, and architects were challenged to question, test and shake up Amsterdam in alignment with the theme.” Photos by Janus van den Eijnden.


Masamichi Shimada


Republic of Amsterdam Radio and Nomad Tinker House


UxU Studio


Lucy McDonnell (Studio Vertigo)

Artists include Alicia Eggert, Ben Zamora, Har Hollands, Laila Azra, Studio Vertigo, Martin Ersted, Masamichi Shimada, UxU Studio, and several others. The event, running since 2012, has seen 5 million visitors. The 53-day festival has to date, offered more than 240 artworks.

See more on the event’s site.


Karolina Howorko


Sergey Kim (photo by the artist)


Utskottet

Tom Biddulph and Barbara Ryan

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