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Barry McGee Brings ‘The Other Side’ to Perrotin

In Barry McGee’s current show at Perrotin’s Hong Kong gallery, titled “The Other Side,” the artist creates a new immersive environment that blends his love of retro patterns, lettering, advertisements, and comic strip characters. The show runs through Nov. 9 at the space. McGee was featured in Hi-Fructose Vols. 16 and 25.

In Barry McGee’s current show at Perrotin’s Hong Kong gallery, titled “The Other Side,” the artist creates a new immersive environment that blends his love of retro patterns, lettering, advertisements, and comic strip characters. The show runs through Nov. 9 at the space. McGee was featured in Hi-Fructose Vols. 16 and 25.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVyatbnn7NR/

“… McGee adopts a fluid and improvisational approach to his installations; each is unique to the architecture of its exhibition space,” the gallery says. “By incorporating an eclectic selection of media—painted surfboards, hand-thrown ceramics, obsolete television sets—and found objects sourced during his stay in Hong Kong, McGee demonstrates his organic and often unpredictable process of art making. The spontaneity of The Other Side is evocative of the artist’s ongoing dialogue with the neighborhoods in which he resides and his sustained interest in the distinctions between public and private spaces. The result is an inclusive experience that gives insight into McGee’s worldview and his artistic trajectory.”

See more on the gallery’s site.


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