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Levalet’s Site-Specific, Absurdist Drawings

Levalet’s site-specific public drawings use the contours and restrictions of a space to create the unexpected. His absurdist humor appears inside and outside a variety of structures, dangling above passers-by or using objects in disarray to his advantage. Recent pieces have popped up in France and Italy.

Levalet’s site-specific public drawings use the contours and restrictions of a space to create the unexpected. His absurdist humor appears inside and outside a variety of structures, dangling above passers-by or using objects in disarray to his advantage. Recent pieces have popped up in France and Italy.


“The work of Levalet is above all a work of drawing and installation,” a statement says. “He stages his characters drawn in Indian ink in the public space, in a game of visual and semantic dialogue with the present environment. The characters interact with the architecture and unfold in situations often bordering on the absurd.”

See more of his interventions below.

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