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Yiğit Can Alper’s Ghostly Watercolor Scenes

The watercolor paintings of Turkish artist Yiğit Can Alper carry a ghostly quality, their creatures disappearing into sparse backdrops. Alper's drab figures and structures seem to be part of a dilapidated world. And the textures of the material render each component as a temporary apparition.

The watercolor paintings of Turkish artist Yiğit Can Alper carry a ghostly quality, their creatures disappearing into sparse backdrops. Alper’s drab figures and structures seem to be part of a dilapidated world. And the textures of the material render each component as a temporary apparition.

The motifs in Alper’s work include massive animals and solitary riders, both of and beyond this world. The contraptions adorning his characters are near-Steampunk, or at the very least, a hodgepodge of found materials. In social media posts, the artist opts for describing the paint rather than any specific narrative.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bf0pfVKH2WC/?taken-by=ycalper

See more of Alper’s work below.

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