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Michael Tole Re-Examines Mythology in Paintings

In Michael Tole's paintings, such as "Diana and Actaeon: Backwards and in Stiletto Boots," the painter recasts mythological scenes through a contemporary lens. In this effort, Tole touches on gender and other cultural issues. The artist says that wardrobe pieces in the above painting are taken from the 2018 Moschino spring/summer line.

In Michael Tole‘s paintings, such as “Diana and Actaeon: Backwards and in Stiletto Boots,” the painter recasts mythological scenes through a contemporary lens. In this effort, Tole touches on gender and other cultural issues. The artist says that wardrobe pieces in the above painting are taken from the 2018 Moschino spring/summer line.

“After ten years of prolific artistic production and exhibition around the country, Michael has taken the past four years to re-evaluate and re-invent his work,” a statement says. “This new work reflects his loss of innocence due to an increasing awareness of, and evolving understanding of American pop culture. This dawning awareness results from a reintroduction to pop music via his young daughters, his relocation to Tempe, AZ, and near proximity to Southern California.”

See Tole’s prior work to this series below.

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