Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Matthew Stone’s Painted Figures Made From Digital, Traditional Means

Matthew Stone creates surreal, figurativeworks that are a combination of digital printing and acrylic on linen. The London-based artist, part of the art collective !WOWOW!, has worked in painting, photography, sculpting, performance art, writing, and other endeavors. “Healing With Wounds,” a newer body of work, is said to be “showing diverse bodies at play and in conflict.” He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Matthew Stone creates surreal, figurativeworks that are a combination of digital printing and acrylic on linen. The London-based artist, part of the art collective !WOWOW!, has worked in painting, photography, sculpting, performance art, writing, and other endeavors. “Healing With Wounds,” a newer body of work, is said to be “showing diverse bodies at play and in conflict.” He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“Stone’s most recent body of work demonstrates an innate enthusiasm for the development of painting within the framework of art history,” a statement says. “The new works, use 3d modelling software and paint to break with the history of painting on a flat surface, lifting the strokes into a virtual and free space. The addition of shadows and foreshortening creates an illusionistic – trompe l’oeil sense of depth and perspective within the canvases. He organises and examines complex statements in regard to the relationship between painting, photography and computer-generated imagery disrupting the holy status of painting as the ‘cosmic flesh’ of art history whilst simultaneously pushing the visceral experience of paint forward.”

Stone was born in England, and he attended Camberwell College of Arts and graduated with a degree in painting.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Working out of her Austin studio, Leah Haney makes paintings that aspire to create an experience akin to entering a work of architecture. Her mixed-media works are produced with the thesis that painting, much like architecture and design, can stand alone and be experienced on a purely visual level — without piled-on metaphors or subtexts. Haney began her creative journey at UT Austin, yet found a life-changing experience in visiting Florence, Italy shortly on graduating. These days, the artist can be found mostly in her Austin studio complex, constantly rearranging her studio furniture to achieve the best personal environment for creating each piece. We spoke to her about the ways architecture informs her work, her creative process, and her passion for science fiction.
Demonic goddesses and amorphous love children dominate the compositions by Japanese-born, San Francisco-based artist Junko Mizuno (featured on the cover of HF Vol. 23). Mizuno has an expansive oeuvre, which spans such media as graphic novels and television animation. Her original paintings, in addition to wood, giclee and silkscreen prints, will for the first time be seen in London during the artist’s retrospective, "Belle: The Art of Junko Mizuno," opening October 20 at Atomica Gallery.
Painter Allison Zuckerman’s work pulls from the past and digital present of art history to craft amalgamated depictions of women. She first designs her works digitally, then prints them on the canvas before applying paint to the creation. This year has brought multiple museum exhibitions for the artist, including stints at Akron Art Museum and Herziliya Museum and the University of Florida.
Van Arno’s latest series, “Upright,” represents yet another evolution for the painter, who has worked professionally for two decades and taught for five years. Arno was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List