Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Matthew Stone’s Painted Figures Made From Digital, Traditional Means

Matthew Stone creates surreal, figurativeworks that are a combination of digital printing and acrylic on linen. The London-based artist, part of the art collective !WOWOW!, has worked in painting, photography, sculpting, performance art, writing, and other endeavors. “Healing With Wounds,” a newer body of work, is said to be “showing diverse bodies at play and in conflict.” He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Matthew Stone creates surreal, figurativeworks that are a combination of digital printing and acrylic on linen. The London-based artist, part of the art collective !WOWOW!, has worked in painting, photography, sculpting, performance art, writing, and other endeavors. “Healing With Wounds,” a newer body of work, is said to be “showing diverse bodies at play and in conflict.” He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“Stone’s most recent body of work demonstrates an innate enthusiasm for the development of painting within the framework of art history,” a statement says. “The new works, use 3d modelling software and paint to break with the history of painting on a flat surface, lifting the strokes into a virtual and free space. The addition of shadows and foreshortening creates an illusionistic – trompe l’oeil sense of depth and perspective within the canvases. He organises and examines complex statements in regard to the relationship between painting, photography and computer-generated imagery disrupting the holy status of painting as the ‘cosmic flesh’ of art history whilst simultaneously pushing the visceral experience of paint forward.”

Stone was born in England, and he attended Camberwell College of Arts and graduated with a degree in painting.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Dan Gluibizzi, a Portland-based artist, mixes acrylics and watercolors for his works, each a collection of portraits that together create social examinations. Whether his subjects are in business attire or unclothed, an intimacy carries throughout the sparse works. The artist scours the Internet, specifically nudist blogs and Tumblrs, for inspiration in creating his paintings.
Todd Schorr will be signing copies of his retrospective book "Never Lasting Miracles" at SINBIN/Halfling Studios in Portland next week. The 11,000-square-foot maker space is owned by Sandy Bodecker, Nike's VP of special projects. Bodecker and Nike CEO Mark Parker are longtime collectors and supporters of Schorr’s work. “Never Last Miracles” was reviewed in Hi-Fructose Vol. 46. The signing/release party arrives Aug. 2 at 6 p.m. Ahead of the event, we talked to Schorr about the 8-pound tome, collecting 30 years of the artist’s work.
There's a palpable darkness that permeates the surreal oil paintings of Philippine artist Leslie De Chavez. Rendered on large, black canvases, the shadowy landscapes are home to ghoulish, distorted figures and act as settings to various scenes of violence, corruption and suffering. Born in Manila, De Chavez uses his art to reflect upon current socio-political issues that affect his homeland. Through use of powerful text and imagery, his works explore religion, national identity, global capitalism, power struggle, and corruption within modern government. While the works appear dismal and often sinister, De Chavez is driven by the hope that his art can create awareness and inspire positive, progressive change within his community.
Naomi Okubo’s acrylic paintings on cotton wrestle with identity, offering both introspective scenes and rich experiments in patterns and texture. The artist's work is influenced by the ideals given to us by mass media and gender norms. Her work pulls from advertisements, self-portraits, and other sources.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List