Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Whimsical Sculptures of Yuanxing Liang

In Yuanxing Liang’s folkloric sculptures, the hair of his figures become their own whimsical landscapes. Liang, formerly a game character designer, is now a full time artist, often working within fantastical figurative sculpture. Many have noted the challenge of displaying his work, as each pieces comes fully realized and detailed, 360 degrees of intricate notes from the artist.

In Yuanxing Liang’s folkloric sculptures, the hair of his figures become their own whimsical landscapes. Liang, formerly a game character designer, is now a full time artist, often working within fantastical figurative sculpture. Many have noted the challenge of displaying his work, as each pieces comes fully realized and detailed, 360 degrees of intricate notes from the artist.

A graduate of Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts, Liang’s recent work is derived from ancient narratives. Pieces such as “Chunmang. Peach Blossom Island” are based on narratives like”Peach Blossom Dragon Spring,” a fable written in 421 CE, detailing the discovery of a utopian world.

See more of Liang’s work below.


Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Portland illustrator Song Kang blends architecture and natural structures in both her intensely detailed drawings and her absorbing sculptures. The latter even uses the inherent forms of the animal kingdom as foundations for her designs. The "Vernacular" series has works created from wood, paper mache, plaster, fiber, recyclables, and other materials.
Russian-born artist Sergei Isupov investigates binaries in human relationships — male and female, good and evil, beautiful and grotesque. Using clay as both a material for three-dimensional expression and as a canvas for his illustrations, Isupov capitalizes on all properties of what he finds to be the most open medium. He sculpts human and animal figures, and then adds illustrations in glaze. The paintings diffuse into the clay’s surface, like tattoos on his sculptures’ skin. Taken together, the two- and three-dimensional elements of his work establish a compacted but powerful scene of emotions and narratives.
Australian artist Amanda Parer has her sights set on a global invasion with her dramatic, illuminated sculptures. Her oversized, inflatable creations have been exhibited across the world at a variety of festivals, museums and public spaces. On her website, the artist shares that her work aims to "explore the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it." Photo by Felisa Tan Photography www.felisatanphotography.com @felisatanphoto
Eddy Kamuanga Ilunga, a painter based in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, crafts oil and acrylic works that blend traditional iconography and technological symbology. In particular, the Illunga series “Mangbetu” comments on a native culture coerced into modernization, as the region is an exporter of material used in computer chips.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List