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Wang Ruilin’s Whimsical, Surreal Animal Sculptures

Whimsy, humor and fantasy collide in the sculpture of Beijing artist Wang Ruilin. Some pieces are realistic reproductions of animals’ bodies while others manipulate these bodies to create an unexpected effects. His “Horse Play” series feel especially humorous. The horses have expressive eyes and tuck in their necks almost petulantly. In one piece, horses pile on top of each other into a pyramid; at the top a horse stands with his head cocked to one side. Wang highlights each flesh fold on these horses, making their sculptural bodies seem lively.

Whimsy, humor and fantasy collide in the sculpture of Beijing artist Wang Ruilin. Some pieces are realistic reproductions of animals’ bodies while others manipulate these bodies to create an unexpected effects. His “Horse Play” series feel especially humorous. The horses have expressive eyes and tuck in their necks almost petulantly. In one piece, horses pile on top of each other into a pyramid; at the top a horse stands with his head cocked to one side. Wang highlights each flesh fold on these horses, making their sculptural bodies seem lively.

Wang’s “Dreams” series depicts other animal bodies, some with natural environments atop their backs or torsos. There is a decidedly surreal twist to these pieces. In one, mountains sit atop fluffy clouds perched on deer antlers. The deer’s heads gracefully touch to create this mysterious landscape. In another piece, a whale’s back holds what looks like a small ocean. Small pieces of a glacier float in its blue water, alluding to the changes the Earth is currently experiencing as climate change takes its course. These animals share something in common: they seem to harbor secrets we can’t quite unlock.

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