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Mario Moore Explores ‘Recovery’ in New Show

"A Student's Dream," the central oil painting in Mario Moore's new show, is inspired by the artist's recent surgery to remove a benign brain tumor. "Recovery" kicks off at David Klein Gallery in Detroit at the end of the month, and in the show, the artist looks at how African-American men experience recovery from hardship and trauma.

“A Student’s Dream,” the central oil painting in Mario Moore‘s new show, is inspired by the artist’s recent surgery to remove a benign brain tumor. “Recovery” kicks off at David Klein Gallery in Detroit at the end of the month, and in the show, the artist looks at how African-American men experience recovery from hardship and trauma.

“The process of recovery is imperative for a body that has endured a certain trauma or physical strain,” the artist says, in a statement. “Yet, In America, there is an expectation for Black men to perpetually prevail—to keep working, keep fighting, and deny the body rest – despite the pains they may endure. Throughout history, Black men in America have been bombarded with endless conflict against their minds and bodies, rarely ever having opportunity to consider self-care.”

The show runs June 30 through Aug. 11 at the gallery. Moore’s work is also featured in the group “Black Blooded,” currently running at New Gallery in Charlotte, N.C. See more works from “Recovery” below.

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