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Alluring and Emotive Multimedia Works by Candice Bohannon

California based artist Candice Bohannon creates alluring and emotive figurative works using a multitude of media. Her subjects are often portrayed alone and drifting into sleep, emoting solitude and tranquility in their quieter moments. In her statement, Bohannon describes her work as "the invisible yet perceptible quality of awareness, emotions, experiences, memories and expectations, the ethereal nature of the human soul and a searching for comfort and familiarity in the sublime unknown."

California based artist Candice Bohannon creates alluring and emotive figurative works using a multitude of media. Her subjects are often portrayed alone and drifting into sleep, emoting solitude and tranquility in their quieter moments. In her statement, Bohannon describes her work as “the invisible yet perceptible quality of awareness, emotions, experiences, memories and expectations, the ethereal nature of the human soul and a searching for comfort and familiarity in the sublime unknown.” Although her images are highly representative, there is a layered poetry behind each image. She aims to capture the truths of her subjects’ being while also forming a connection to the viewer through their gaze. Bohannon finds inspiration in the mysterious gazes of subjects of mid-15th century Flemish and Netherlandish artists like Hans Memling, Jan Van Eyck, Rogier Van der Weyden, and Petrus Christus. Classically trained, she regularly experiments with new materials and techniques, however she can obtain the right mood and texture; most works combine oil and acrylics, but she has also created encaustic or hot wax paintings, ink on mylar, and oil on panel works. Last year, she also began experimenting with oil painting on marble. At her instagram, Bohannon goes into great detail about the artistic process behind each piece. Take a look at more of her works below, courtesty of the artist.


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