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Show Looks Back on Sculptures of Click Mort

In a show titled "Posthumorous / Post Mort ’em," La Luz de Jesus looks back at the work of Click Mort, who passed away last year. Mort, known for his “recapitated figures,” crafted humorous, hybrid ceramic sculptures from existing pieces. He was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 34 and was last featured on our site here.

In a show titled “Posthumorous / Post Mort ’em,” La Luz de Jesus looks back at the work of Click Mort, who passed away last year. Mort, known for his “recapitated figures,” crafted humorous, hybrid ceramic sculptures from existing pieces. He was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 34 and was last featured on our site here.

“Click Mort was more than just an artist on our roster,” says gallery director Matt Kennedy. “The thing that represents my soul best of all is an alligator’s body with a little nurse girl’s head on it. At least one person in the world — namely Click — finds that lovely. I know he does because he spent countless hours crafting it.”

The show runs Feb. 2-25, alongside the Pool y Marianela show “Kidstianism” and the Dan Barry show “Passing Time.” See more of the work in the Mort retrospective below.


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