Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Claire Partington’s Figures Combine Centuries of Narratives, Styles

Claire Partington, a ceramics artist living and working in London, is a storyteller. The artist says that the aesthetic of her spellbinding figures is inspired by the “European Applied Art and Design styles from the 1600s onwards.” Yet, she’s fascinated by the tradition of appropriating so-called “exotic” styles and cobbling together influences into a single artifact also drives her work.


Claire Partington, a ceramics artist living and working in London, is a storyteller. The artist says that the aesthetic of her spellbinding figures is inspired by the “European Applied Art and Design styles from the 1600s onwards.” Yet, she’s fascinated by the tradition of appropriating so-called “exotic” styles and cobbling together influences into a single artifact also drives her work.

Several of her figures have interchangeable heads, further adding to the narratives and mystery of the pieces. Partington uses traditional processes to create these figures. They’re coil-built and then refined before “adding surface decorations of sprigged (press molded) ephemera and modern computer generated enamel decoration over the glaze.”

“Narrative and the retelling and misinterpretation of stories is at the center of my work,” Partington says, in a statement. “Initially concentrating on reimagining and retelling Folk and fairy stories with particularly strong imagery, then merging these stories with imagined back stories for historical figures and their associated iconic imagery.”

Partington’s works can be found in private collections across the globe, including eydan Weiss Collection and 21C Museum.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
The ceramic sculptures of Hitomi Murakami tether humanity to nature in a way that appears both elegant and chilling. Her figures grow from vegetation and are consumed by it, exposed and writhing. Works such as “Land of Root,” in contrast, seem more connected to wonder.
The remixed and altered porcelain sculptures of ceramicist Penny Byrne often have a political edge. Byrne's methods recall the methods of Barnaby Barford and the late Click Mort. She uses enamel paints, epoxy resin, putty, and other materials to evolve these found statues.
Charles Birnbaum, a New York City-based artist, creates abstract ceramic pieces that seem both alien and influenced from the stranger part of nature. Whether it’s his wall sculptures or free-standing “vessels,” each pushes the form far beyond its classical uses. His work is held in collections and exhibited across the world.
Lindsey Mendick’s autobiographical ceramic works and installations bring cerebral and surreal touches to the everyday. Upon inspection of these staged scenes in her gallery shows, viewers find both elegance and the unsettling in the details of Mendick’s stirring work.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List