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The Strange, Surreal Worlds of Michael Hutter

The oil paintings of Michael Hutter offer worlds that contain elements of fantasy, science, and something even further beyond reality. The German artist has been giving glimpses of these worlds for the past few decades, toying with familiar elements and narratives.


The oil paintings of Michael Hutter offer worlds that contain elements of fantasy, science, and something even further beyond reality. The German artist has been giving glimpses of these worlds for the past few decades, toying with familiar elements and narratives.

“To evoke these pictures I developed some techniques which consists of my way to deal with literature, art, music, philosophy, science, religion and pseudo-science afar from mainstream culture,” the artist says, in a statement. “I don’t care for reality or the probability that something is true, only for its potential to stimulate my thought. In my opinion truth is somehow an illusion anyway. I mix that with my obsession, passions, desires and fears and choke what happens in the abyss of my personality back on the surface.”



Hutter’s work has been compared to Pieter, Brueghel, Hieronymus Bosch, and Dali. These paintings have been offered in galleries across the world since he emerged in the mid-1980s.

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