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Máximo Riera Mixes Odes to the Organic, Contemporary in Furniture

Máximo Riera, a Spanish artist, creates pieces of furniture that pay homage to the natural world. An example of this is seen in his lifesized, fully detailed versions of rhinos, frogs, walruses, bison, and more are made to order, taking a total of 480 hours for each piece. The animal and chair portion are created from polyurethane, while the seats come in leather with a steel internal frame. The artist has also made furniture from millenarian olive tree wood, along with geometric, metallic framing that presents a mix of the organic and the contemporary. The nature of the material makes each of these unique. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.


Máximo Riera, a Spanish artist, creates pieces of furniture that pay homage to the natural world. An example of this is seen in his lifesized, fully detailed versions of rhinos, frogs, walruses, bison, and more are made to order, taking a total of 480 hours for each piece. The animal and chair portion are created from polyurethane, while the seats come in leather with a steel internal frame. The artist has also made furniture from millenarian olive tree wood, along with geometric, metallic framing that presents a mix of the organic and the contemporary. The nature of the material makes each of these unique. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“These trees, planted some 900 years ago, produced what is wildly regarded as the highest quality olive. Once the production cycle ends and for other damages, they are unfairly discarded,” the artist says.


The artist uses 3D-modeling programs to pull off the designs. An explanation for Riera’s Elephant offers insight to the thought behind the works: “The Elephant is the largest land mammal, known for its memory, intelligence and wisdom. This particular piece is produced using morphometric data to resemble the Asian Elephant species having physical characteristic from this particular type. The Artist wanted to highlight the ties of the Indian culture using carving in the chair section.”

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