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Maximo Reira’s Unusual Furniture Designs Take Inspiration from the Animal Kingdom

Maximo Reira has a background in painting, photography, and sculpture, the latter of which he applies to his innovative, functional furniture designs. For his new "Animal Chairs" series, he sculpted large, realistic animals such as octopi, rhinos, and whales, using part of their bodies to create a throne-like seat. Mostly monochromatic with a natural color palette, the chairs have an elegant and otherworldly quality to them.

Maximo Reira has a background in painting, photography, and sculpture, the latter of which he applies to his innovative, functional furniture designs. For his new “Animal Chairs” series, he sculpted large, realistic animals such as octopi, rhinos, and whales, using part of their bodies to create a throne-like seat. Mostly monochromatic with a natural color palette, the chairs have an elegant and otherworldly quality to them.

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