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Kunihiko Nohara’s Wooden Sculptures Consumed in Clouds

Japanese sculptor Kunihiko Nohara’s creations are often engulfed in clouds and mists, yet each is created with a single piece of wood. These pop-surrealist creations can vary in size, with some looming over passers-by and others small enough to be held. All evoke the viewers’ own dreams and fantasies, as they offer a portal into Nohara’s own.

Japanese sculptor Kunihiko Nohara’s creations are often engulfed in clouds and mists, yet each is created with a single piece of wood. These pop-surrealist creations can vary in size, with some looming over passers-by and others small enough to be held. All evoke the viewers’ own dreams and fantasies, as they offer a portal into Nohara’s own.





The artist chose wood as his material because of its connection to Japanese style, long used as both a practical and artistic tool. Through his careful process and vibrant colors, Nohara is able to emulate whimsical, cloud-like forms. He chooses these for several reasons.


“When I first have an idea of what I want to create, it’s usually very blur and vague,” Nohara told the website Expat Living in 2015. “I chose clouds as my main motif because they’re exactly like the images I have in my head–temporary, ever-changing and they can instantly disappear. I also feel very relaxed and comfortable when inspiration hits me–a sensation quite similar to floating in the sky. If you noticed, my sculptures also wear goggles because I imagine floating in the sky to be similar to swimming in a pool.”

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