Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Damián Ortega Debuts New Sculptural Installations in Milan Retrospective

Mexican artist Damián Ortega (covered here) reconceptualizes everyday objects in his sculptural installations. For twenty years, his creative interests have lied in the deconstruction of form and how things are assembled. His solo exhibition at HangarBiocca in Milan, Italy, "Casino," is also a retrospective of his most famous works through today. This includes his new installation, "Zoom," made for the event. The experience of viewing his artwork has been described as "explosive," displaying a burst of energy, like an exploding star. Objects and vehicles such as his Volkswagon Bug, "Cosmic Thing," (2002) are transformed as a critique about technological innovation. See more after the jump.

Mexican artist Damián Ortega (covered here) reconceptualizes everyday objects in his sculptural installations. For twenty years, his creative interests have lied in the deconstruction of form and how things are assembled. His solo exhibition at HangarBiocca in Milan, Italy, “Casino,” is also a retrospective of his most famous works through today. This includes his new installation, “Zoom,” made for the event. The experience of viewing his artwork has been described as “explosive,” displaying a burst of energy, like an exploding star. Objects and vehicles such as his Volkswagon Bug, “Cosmic Thing,” (2002) are transformed as a critique about technological innovation. Another example is his piece “Hollow/Stuffed: market law” (2012), a hanging submarine replica made of sacks full of salt which spill out onto the gallery floor.


Damián Ortega, with one of his sculptural installations in “Casino.”

The exhibition’s main theme centers around vehicles, specifically a trilogy of Beetle cars in various stages. Ortega has a personal relationship with the car. When he was a teenager, his father handed down to him a white Beetle, the same model used in his installations. Once his car became obsolete, Ortega decided to to pay tribute to it with his art. The individual car parts are made of metal and other cheap materials, representing another concept in Ortega’s works. As a young artist, he did not have the means required to make highbrow sculptures, encouraging him to source alternative methods. His use of everyday objects as media, in this sense, becomes an economical and philosophical reflection. It is not the same as Found Object art, the display of a repurposed, commonplace objects. Ortega is using objects in the way that a painter uses paint and a brush.

“Casino” by Damián Ortega is now on view at HangarBicocca in Milan through November 8.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Scott Musgrove’s 7.5-foot-tall, 12-foot-wide triptych “The Sanctuary” is finally complete. The artist spent nearly three years on the piece—made from oil on panel, wood, bronze, and glass—while simultaneously working on shows and other projects. (Musgrove was last featured on HiFructose.com here.) Below, the artist shares exclusive commentary on the creation of this piece with Hi-Fructose.
Crystal Wagner’s otherworldly installations are both spellbinding and unsettling. The works resemble something organic, yet are constructed from paper, wire, wood, paint, sealant, and other materials. Her recent pieces are part of the new show "Dimensions of Three" at Allouche Gallery in New York City, along with Martin Gremse and Reinoud Oudshoorn. The show starts Nov. 30 and runs through Dec. 31. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she last appeared on our website here.
A self-described b-boy, Japanese sculptor Taku Obata creates colorful wooden sculptures that pay homage to breakdancing and hip-hop culture. In his latest body of work, dancers clad in neon sweat suits assume exaggerated stances that evoke the athleticism and freedom of expression break dancing celebrates. Elonaged hats, glasses, and folds in the characters' clothing convey a sense of movement, as if we're seeing the forms captured in a long-exposure photograph. For these works, Obata uses traditional Japanese carving techniques, invoking his heritage through the way he approaches his contemporary subject matter.
The last time we featured sculptor Jessica Laurel Louise, aka Jessica Dalva, she was exploring a ritualistic narrative with her feminine works. In the two years since, her art has developed to reflect a multitude of personal interests and skills; her hand-painted sculptures, shadow boxes, drawings, and recently, clay animation, collectively exhibit a cinematic taste. Communicating movement has become an important focus for Dalva. She keeps a diary of her excursions at her blog, from her travels to studying animal anatomy at Natural History Museum, and drying scarves in the wind. These have had a noticeable effect on her artwork. Read more after the jump.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List